PEACE

Peace is a state of non-suffering as well as a celebration of life. We now know from many spiritual teachers that we can make a choice to live in peace within our own hearts, that we can actually choose not to suffer and choose instead to live in gratitude and love. Not only that, but we are also learning that finding and claiming that peace within us is essential to creating a world at peace. Because all of life is interconnected, our fear, hatred and anger decreases the peace in the world, whereas our love, joy and gratitude increases the peace.
Peace is a certain quality of existence which has been sought after, yet seldom found in a long enduring form, since time immemorial. In a behavioral sense, peace is generally understood to be a lack of conflict and freedom from fear of violence between heterogeneous social groups.
Peace talks often start without preconditions and preconceived notions because they are more than just negotiating opportunities. They place attention on peace itself, over and above what may have been previously perceived as the competing needs or interests of separate individuals or parties, in a way which can sometimes derive unexpected, yet beneficial results.
More than 1.5 billion people live in countries affected by violent conflict, and the gap between those countries enjoying relative peace and those afflicted by conflict is growing. The newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals respond to the fact that no low-income conflict-affected country achieved a single one of the framework’s predecessor, the Millennium Development Goals. Peacebuilding approaches, including mediation and diplomacy, dialogue and participation, are an essential part of the toolkit we need to meet Goal 16: to “promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development.”

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